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Category: Executive Job Search Tips (page 1 of 10)

The Most Employable Cities In America

Getting a c-level job is never an easy task, no matter what city you live in. Every position you apply for is likely to have hundreds of applications and sometimes rejection after rejection can hurt your confidence. What city do you live in? Is that affecting your chances? The truth is that it’s always going to be easier to get a job in some cities over others and it’s worth checking out this infographic from Hansen & Company, taking you through cities with high levels of employment growth.

If you live near Texas, you could be in a good position to pick up a c-level job. Cities such as Plano, Texas are experiencing fantastic employment growth right now, with very healthy wages available. It may be worth checking if there are any jobs in Plano, or in any area on the list, that could be a good fit for you. Learn more in the infographic now!

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The Most Employable Cities in America

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Quick Tip: How to Find CXO Jobs

>> Not able to listen to the audio right now? Click here to read the transcript. <<

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New Neuroscience Reveals 4 Rituals That Will Make You Happy

Fantastic information here for the executive job seeker – so important to approach the job search with the “right spirit.”

Read about it here.

 

 

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Tips for VP/CXO Executives Who Have Never Had to Search for a Position Before

Approximately 60 percent of executives I speak with will share with me in our initial conversation that they have always been recruited for positions – and that for the first time in a very long time, they are faced with finding their next opportunity themselves. They may have some contacts and even a few recruiters they keep in touch with. But their resume has not been updated in over a decade, they don’t do much with LinkedIn, and they are aware the job search landscape has changed … but don’t feel prepared for the trip. They generally think the right next move is to  “update their resume and see what is out there…”

If that sounds like you, the tips below will help bring clarity regarding the correct steps to take to move forward confidently. It is a positive place to be, filled with opportunity since you come with no preconceived notions of the job search!

Equally important to note is you want to start your executive transition the right way. The reason why is because the wrong resume, the wrong approach, the wrong job search techniques and the wrong expectations can sap your energy and leave you feeling frustrated in a matter of weeks or months.

Here are some key tips to prevent that from happening to you:

DETERMINE YOUR FOCUS OF DIRECTION

First, you have to plan. A few things you will want to know are:

  • What key skills do you want to use?
  • What size company do you want to be with?
  • What titles would you find enticing?
  • Do you have a location preference?
  • What industry would you like to be in?
  • What are your driving motivators? (The things you have to have no matter what. This could be an industry change, a compensation range, a location or other.)
  • What is your time frame and sense of urgency?
  • How is the industry you are interested in doing economically? It is growing or stable? Is it in decline? Ideally, you want to fish where the fish are biting so bear that in mind if your industry is lagging … you may want to look for industries that are connected or on the periphery that present more opportunities.

BUILD YOUR EXECUTIVE RESUME

Now that you have defined the points important to you, you can (and must) build your resume TO them. That means beginning at the end and working backward. Your CXO resume is a marketing document, not a historical career narrative. A very valuable exercise is to explore online jobs to gauge what you are drawn to. Once you have found two or three, you can look for running themes in keywords and phrases. You want to use these as the basis for designing your executive resume.  This is where a top executive resume writer can really pay off. It can be difficult to write about yourself in the light you truly should in order to accurately and crisply convey your value proposition and professional polish. Many executives feel as if they are bragging. When writing your resume, you can quell this feeling by simply focusing on your metric-driven accomplishments. The facts, as they say, speak for themselves. Always start your bullets with those facts. In other words, the result comes first, then you tell how you accomplished the result.

EXECUTIVE JOB SEARCH STRATEGIES

Finally, you need to use the right job search techniques. Searching at the SVP or CXO level is tricky. The rulebook is completely different. You can’t exactly pass your resume around and ask your buddies if they know of any key executive roles (and to call you if they run across one). I mean, you can – but this strategy is counter to you as a leader. Leaders take charge. They maintain more control than this. Fortunately, there are many job search strategies that work flawlessly and are in alignment with leaders and executives. They involve helping others make good decisions for you by giving them the right information. The mediums can be both passive and active as there is a time and place for both strategies and they usually include a combination of executive recruiters, private equity firms, executive networking, LinkedIn and going direct (the hidden job market).

This is a foolproof systematic approach used by top executives across the globe. I hope this empowers you with knowledge that you do not have to give up being the leader you are to facilitate your job transition. In fact, having control of your transition can instead mean that you get to cherry-pick your next ideal role and command premier compensation for it!

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Quick Tips for C-Level Executives on Working with Executive Recruiters

executive-recruitersWorking with executive recruiters is one of the primary ways top executives find their next opportunity. Here are a few tips from the top retained recruiting firms that place senior executives and those seeking BOD positions.

  1. Make sure you match up your skills and industry with their specialty for best results – although many major recruiting firms cover most industries.
  1. Don’t worry about geography. Recruiters are primarily industry specialists and will have clients everywhere.
  1. Send them a great resume in PDF format. They may ask for a word version, or ask you to upload your resume into their database or fill out a form on their website (someone has to do it) as well.
  1. Call. It takes more time to call, but your call will be worth it. Ask the person answering the phone for someone specifically or the recruiter who is in charge of your industry (e.g., the recruiter that specializes in general operations searches, or construction, or healthcare, etc.). Have what you want to say written out. Note that you should call before sending your resume if you are in a confidential or passive search.

If you have not sent your resume:

“Hi, this is ____ and I am a(n) ____. I am calling to introduce myself. I am in a (highly confidential – tell them if you are!) career transition and I wanted to reach out to you personally because I understand that you specialize in my industry.  May I send you my resume? I would welcome a conversation if you feel I am a good match for any of your open searches.”

If you have sent your resume:

“Hi this is ____. I sent my resume in last week and wanted to follow up with a phone call to briefly introduce myself and to find out if you have any open searches in the ____ industry that I might be a good potential candidate for.”

  1. Understand what motivates recruiters to pitch you their best client company job openings.
  • Be the candidate that matches their industry and position hot spot.
  • Have excellent marketing material and learn how to interview so they don’t have to train you.
  • Act professionally on the phone and in person.
  • If you say something that sounds an alarm, the client company will typically tell the recruiter. The recruiter may or may not divulge this to you, because it’s a slippery slope.
  • Rehearse your interviews and understand what the right and wrong things to say are.  Speak to the recruiter professionally; don’t confide, even if pressed or if you are buddies with the recruiter. They are not working for you, they are working for the company.

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Great advice from Harvard Business Review: Give Yourself Permission to Work Fewer Hours

I love this article from Harvard Business Review! I always coach my clients to lead and manage their job search by setting up systems and keeping an eye on the hours they spend on their transition. This way, they feel more in control and they protect themselves from “job search burnout.” I do this with my company too. High achievers benefit from this by being more present and having more energy as well as keeping an eye on anything that could be delegated to others. Simple stuff with a very palpable return.

Read more here

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Resilience is About How You Recharge Not How You Endure

jun16-24-611469745-1024x576Fantastic article from Harvard Business Review.  I always tell my clients to increase double their play time & get their executive transition search activities down to 2 hours a week.  At first they think I am crazy but it works so well! This article explains why.  Read more here

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Attention CXO’s: How to Fake It When You’re Not Feeling Confident

Great article in Harvard Business Review titled:    

How to Fake It When You’re Not Feeling Confident

My favorite takeaways from this (I do these myself!) very insightful little piece:

  • Emulate what your mentors/those you admire do
  • Baby steps: smaller pieces
  • Don’t beat yourself up for not being ready – just move forward.
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Growing Industries from AESC

According to the latest report from The Association of Executive Search and Leadership Consultants (AESC), growing industries in 2016 include Technology, Healthcare & Life Sciences, Industrial, and Professional Services.

Here is a snapshot of the anticipated growth in chart form:

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FORTUNE World’s Most Admired Companies 2016

Korn Ferry together with Hay Group and FORTUNE Magazine rank the worlds most admired companies. Apple, Alphabet (Google), Amazon, Costco, Facebook, salesforce.com and Aetna  made the list. See all the rankings here.

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