Contact The Career Artisan

Set a MeetingorSend a Message

Page 2 of 43

4 Areas Where Communication Etiquette is Key

I really like and admire recruiter friend, Ardith Rademacher. She has given me the thumbs up to repost one of her latest articles here – it’s on communication etiquette. Enjoy these great tips!

Can We Talk?

Guest Post by Ardith Rademacher

In today’s society, instant gratification has infiltrated the workplace in all areas of communication. This has changed how colleagues and management interact. However, this change is not necessarily for the better. We have moved from submitting meeting requests on paper or via the phone, to emails, and now on to instant messages or texts. The expected response time has decreased dramatically from a business day to several hours, and in some cases down to just several minutes or even seconds.

There are some people who do not even employ these types of communication. They simply walk right into their colleague’s office and begin discussing whatever topic is on their mind. This is very disrupting to the other person’s productivity. They have not only been interrupted from their train of thought and have to find it again, but are now expected to remember a meeting, for example, that they have only heard about verbally, versus through at least an email for reference.

Communication etiquette does not need to remain a lost art. Here are a few examples of places where the most common etiquette pitfalls occur and how to resolve these issues.

Email

An email is essentially a business letter that is delivered to the recipient in minutes versus days. Email is considered a standard form of communication in the workplace. However, many treat it too causally.  All emails should be kept formal. The use of emoticons and excessive punctuation would never happen in a formal business letter. Therefore, they should not appear in emails sent from your work email address. An easy way to make sure that you are on track with proper email etiquette is to ask yourself, “If there was ever an issue that my boss needed to get involved with, and this email had to be pulled out as part of the resolution, is it something that I want my boss to see?”

Meetings

It is very tempting to walk up to a team member’s desk for a quick meeting, especially in open office settings. This is not only distracting, but considered rude by the staff member and others working near them. You can set an example of how to properly set up a meeting by showing your subordinates what to do. Next time you want to meet with someone in your office, even if it is urgent, do not say,”Come to my office right now”. Instead, show that person proper etiquette by sending a message stating, “I need to meet with you in my office immediately. Please finish what you are doing and come see me”. This tells the person that even though you have something urgent to discuss, you respect the fact that he is in the middle of something and are willing for him to complete his thought or his task before meeting with you. When you do meet, do so in your office or an empty conference room (i.e. behind closed doors) so others are not disturbed. When you extend this sort of respect, your subordinates will begin to extend this behavior as well.

Cell Phones, Tablets, etc. in Meetings

It is a myth that multitasking makes us more productive and efficient. If you look in on most meetings, you will see a few people with their heads down checking their email or social media accounts. This is disrespectful to the person speaking or presenting. Set the standard by employing a universal rule that cell phones, tablets, computers, etc. are not allowed in meetings of any sort, unless otherwise stated. Ensure that you follow this rule too, so that even if you are not conducting the meeting, you are showing your subordinates that you respect the presenter and what he has to say.

Conversations with Colleagues

Humans are social creatures by nature. Having a conversation about your weekend with colleagues at lunch is perfectly acceptable.  Walking from office to office, or cubicle to cubicle, and striking up conversations while others are working is not acceptable. It is also important to remember the necessary separation between work life and personal life. Sharing too much personal information can negatively impact your image.  The rule of thumb is to stick to neutral topics, maintain a more neutral position, and always keep the conversation light and positive.

It is important to practice proper etiquette when utilizing all forms of communication. Doing so shows respect to your clients, customers, and coworkers.


Ardith Rademacher & Associates is proud to introduce our newly designed website, www.strathire.com. For 25 years, Ardith Rademacher has excelled at strategic hiring solutions for construction and engineering organizations nationwide. Following the feedback from our clients and candidates, we designed a website to continue in that tradition. We know that you prefer simplicity which is why our website is simple and clean. We have created a menu which invites you to find information you need about ARA, Inc. and our strategic hiring services. If you are an organization looking for a construction recruiter or if you are a candidate investigating a new construction job, come visit us at www.strathire.com.  As always, I encourage you to respond to this email with your thoughts on the discussion, our new website or how Ardith Rademacher & Associates can be a solution for you.

When I Grow Up, I Want To Be…

Here is a wise idea for Christmas gifts for your little ones….

Karleen Tauszik was nice enough to send me her new book and I wish I had this when I was growing up – check it out here – a great stocking stuffer!

https://www.amazon.com/When-Grow-Up-Want-Possibility/dp/0990489914

25 HOT Startups to Join

Merry Christmas and I hope you are enjoying your holiday season. Do you know that after 10 years running I DEFINITELY see an anecdotal trend: Some of my BEST client success stories happen in the December/January window!

To that end, AngelList has a great newsletter and just posted some HOT startup info! Enjoy, and if you need help with your CXO resume, contact me.

The Executive CMO Resume that Landed 15 Potential Job Interviews in 2 Weeks

The majority of our executive resume clients share that they are able to end their job searches soon after we create their executive resumes. Why? Well, there are three rules we always apply that benefit every one of our CXO clients:

  • The first and most important rule we always follow is that we write TO what you want next vs. a narrative focusing on from where you have been.
  • The second rule is that we create visually stimulating and well-organized executive resumes that are easy to digest and provide fundamental context (scale, scope, and alignment) at the cursory glance.
  • And third, we frontload and highlight the metric-driven results you achieve vs. what you do (a weaker position). This clearly establishes your leadership in the minds of your reader.

In the example below, we applied these three principals for this Chief Marketing Officer of Fortune 500 Companies. We then added some rocket fuel to her existing search strategies by conducting an executive recruiter distribution for her, while introducing her to executive recruiters in her area of expertise.

CMO Executive Resume Sample

Click to view full resume.

View the full CMO executive resume sample here.

Recently this client wrote us to apprise us of her progress. In her email, she states she landed 15 solid recruiter conversations and interviews for potential opportunities. She added that she felt the branding and packaging were incredibly well-received.

I confess — marketing executives are our TOUGHEST clients because after all — we both do the same things! This makes me especially proud and pleased for this outstanding Fortune 500 executive. This serves as a good benchmark for the kinds of results that can be fluidly achieved for C-Level executives if they have these following things in place: a clear focus of direction, expertly written and designed marketing collateral, and 2 or 3 C-level job search strategies.

3 CEO Resume Samples that Show Strengths that WORK

20+ years of expertise summarized in a 2- or 3-page document is not an easy feat. This explains why developing a Chief Executive Officer resume can be tricky. Often, CEOs will come to me with original 5- pages resumes, simply as a result of not knowing what strengths to emphasize and which to minimize or exclude.

However, here are three Executive CEO Resume samples that demonstrate universal selling points that are generally applicable across all C-Level resumes.

Executive Resume Sample #1

Give your audience a clear table of contents at the top of Page 1.

CEO Resume Samples: Executive Resume Sample #1

Click to view full resume.

In this first resume, you see how the CEO spelled out who he is, and where he wants to go—very clearly. For example, just the keywords at the top give you the following information:

  • Industry of Preference and Expertise: Tech Companies in Growth Mode
  • Title: CEO / Advisor
  • Organizational Structure Preferred: Private Equity
  • Special Area of Expertise: M&A’s, Growth

As the eye draws to the document’s other supporting areas, what this CEO specializes in is very clear:

Risk Controls / Executive Board Partnerships / Strategic Exits

With this context – now the reader not only knows the CEO’s primary skills, strengths, and industry preferences, he/she also has enough context to read deeper into the document and digest it. In other words, without a table of contents or summary overview, it’s difficult to digest the details.

View the full CEO executive resume sample #1 here.

Executive Resume Sample #2

Speak from a position of leadership and metrics to set the perception as a results-driven leader in the minds of your readers.

CEO Resume Samples: Executive Resume Sample #2

Click to view full resume.

Leaders are expected to garner results. It is anticipated that their vision and personality will inspire and motivate their teams. By clearly focusing on the results you deliver, you inspire the trust of your readers.

This second executive resume example demonstrates the results the CEO garners. It spans revenue growth, expansions, major transactions, major awards (industry thought leadership), and high-visibility projects.

IMPORTANT: Note that the bullets begin with the CEO’s result…not the activity and THEN the metric result at the end.

View the full CEO executive resume sample #2 here.

Executive Resume Sample #3

Set up your storyline to make it easy for your reader to understand your value.

CEO Resume Samples: Executive Resume Sample #3

Click to view full resume.

This particular resume has some special components. First, it’s a one-page version of a three- page resume. One-page resumes are often preferred by banks, boards, and private equity firms. This resume is also color-branded to the CEO’s industry of choice. It clearly demonstrates her thought leadership and industry expertise. It gives scale and scope at the cursory glance. It is visually very attractive.

Even though it’s only one page, this resume clearly outlines this CEO’s career narrative. It starts with her title and provides a summary of why she was hired. Then, it crisply delivers her primary accomplishments, which are supported with just enough detail in the few bullets below the summary accomplishment. This respects the reader and sets up the storyline so that the reader WANTS to digest, read, and understand this CEO’s career narrative.

IMPORTANT: Note that each bullet begins with her quantifiable result…NOT the activity and then, the result at the end. Beginning with the result shows more energy and power. It translates that this CEO understands it’s the RESULT—not the activity—that is of primary importance.

View the full CEO executive resume sample #3 here.

In summary, the majority of CEOs hire a resume writing firm to develop their marketing documents —but even if you don’t write your own resume, these tips will help you know what to look for in a top executive resume writer or executive resume writing firm!

If you would like to chat about executive resume services, you can request a confidential, complimentary call here.

Manufacturing One of the Leading Sources of U.S. Job Growth – Adds 36,000 Jobs

14 of 18 US factory sectors showed growth in August. Details here:  U.S. August factory activity at 6-plus year high

U.S. Job Openings at a 16-Year High

The monthly Job Openings and Labor Turnover Survey, or JOLTS, released by the Labor Department on Tuesday shows job openings at a record high.

Read more here!

Job Search Tips: Executive Networking at the C-Level

How to empower others to help you and WOW them with your networking savvy.

If you are a CXO, you are in a unique leadership position that makes traditional “networking” a tricky proposition. After all, you can’t really pass around your resume stating, “If you hear of anyone that is looking for a good CEO, please give them my resume.” I mean, technically you CAN, but who would WANT to take this approach?

Leaders do best when they are in control. To maintain control you must lead your networking conversations with confidence and make it easy for others to help you and to make good decisions for you. The best way to do that is by empowering them with information. Here are a few tips:

Create Your List

Create a list of networking contacts and keep adding to it. Don’t “play the end result” by assuming who can and cannot help you. None of us can determine everyone our networking contacts know or what opportunities they may be aware of.

Contact Your List and Tell Them Your Parameters

If you are vetting opportunities, here are a few things you can quickly share with your network that will be important for them to know:

  • Whether your search is out in the open or confidential
  • If you have a geographical preference
  • What titles you would consider
  • What industry or industries you would consider
  • The company size you prefer
  • Your sense of urgency

Your statement may be something like this:

“I wanted to confidentially share with you that I am selectively vetting CTO/CIO/CISO roles in 10B+ technology companies. I would prefer to stay on the East Coast.”

You can follow that up by asking for a short endorsement, sharing you would like to be considered by the company he/she works for or just stating that you are sharing this information with a select small network.

Piggybacking a Request for Endorsement

Asking for an endorsement is a great way to give your networking contact something that they can easily do for you – and it becomes a natural reason to share your parameters with them. After you state your career parameters, ask for a one or two sentence endorsement and if you can, coach them on the topic you wish for them to speak to.  When it comes to endorsements, the shorter the better – like the back of a book jacket. Why? Because they get read whereas paragraphs get skimmed!

Maybe you say:

“I wanted to ask if you wouldn’t mind indulging me with a short endorsement, perhaps something about the XYX merger and my leadership relative to M&A’s in our last two roles together?”

This way, you can collect endorsements that support whatever your goals are moving forward. If you have an ideal role that you know demands certain specific skills, you can help your endorsees by sharing with them what you would like for them to mention. This is a very powerful technique and it allows your network to feel they have done something meaningful for you. You may or may not use all of the endorsements you collect, and that is okay. The bigger goal is to be able to share your career transition goals with your network.

The Art of Not Asking for Help, Job Leads, or Interviews

The hardest part about networking is NOT asking for an interview or pushing in any way. When you ask for information and share with the goal of demonstrating you know who you are and where you are going,  it attracts creativity, help, and intrigue. It empowers those in your network to make good decisions for you. With your new approach, they will be thinking of ways they can aid you and they will do this with more energy because it is now their idea, not yours, and because you didn’t push them into a corner and obligate them to help you!

So the next time you ask for an informational interview or to take your mentor out to coffee with the sole purpose of handing them a resume before they get a chance to ask for it, STOP. Ask for advice, mentoring, information, a referral, and share your job search parameters. Do not ask for an interview, a job, or if they know of anyone who is looking and/or hiring. Yes, asking these questions does work sometimes, but not often. It is uncomfortable to be asked point blank and my clients tell me it’s awkward to ask.  I think it’s a conflict of position.

As a CXO, when you ASK for help by pushing out your resume, you give away your power. Instead, why not demonstrate your savvy, your enthusiasm for possibilities, your leadership, your confidence and your business sense and empower others with the information they need to make good decisions – for you.

The Most Employable Cities In America

Getting a c-level job is never an easy task, no matter what city you live in. Every position you apply for is likely to have hundreds of applications and sometimes rejection after rejection can hurt your confidence. What city do you live in? Is that affecting your chances? The truth is that it’s always going to be easier to get a job in some cities over others and it’s worth checking out this infographic from Hansen & Company, taking you through cities with high levels of employment growth.

If you live near Texas, you could be in a good position to pick up a c-level job. Cities such as Plano, Texas are experiencing fantastic employment growth right now, with very healthy wages available. It may be worth checking if there are any jobs in Plano, or in any area on the list, that could be a good fit for you. Learn more in the infographic now!

(Click image to view full.)

The Most Employable Cities in America

Quick Tip: How to Find CXO Jobs

>> Not able to listen to the audio right now? Click here to read the transcript. <<

« Older posts Newer posts »

© 2018

Theme by Anders NorenUp ↑