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Economy | Mary Elizabeth Bradford - The Career Artisan

Posts Tagged ‘Economy’

Seven Ways to Help OTHERS Find a Job

Wednesday, April 15th, 2009

Do you know someone who is looking for a new job? I bet you wish you could help them, but maybe you think you can’t because you don’t know of any open positions that would fit them? Well, there are lots of ways to help job seekers even if you can’t offer them their dream job. Here are seven tips you can use right now to help your friends and associates that may be in a job search:

Tip #1: Offer to give their resume to a key decision maker in your company
As long as your comfortable with it, why not pass along their resume? You never know when a position might come up or even be created to meet a need!

Tip #2: Invite them to join your network on LinkedIn
The bigger a job seeker’s LinkedIn network, the more chances they’ll have to find and connect with others! The tipping point on LinkedIn is about 65 connections, so you see, it doesn’t take much to quickly create a powerful network!

Tip#3: Endorse them (on LinkedIn), give them a recommendation or offer to be a reference
You don’t have to have been their boss to recommend or endorse them. So, if you can, why not brag a little on the strengths and skills you know they have?

Tip #4: Tell them about my free ezine and article library! :)
They can sign up here: www.maryelizabethbradford.com.

Tip#5: Hear them out
Let them share what they are looking for with you in terms of ideal industries and positions. Do you know ANYONE in their industry of choice that they could network with? You don’t have to know if they are hiring or not – every connection counts and could potentially lead to something else!

Tip #6: Invite them out
Do you attend chamber events, church functions, fundraisers or association meetings? Why not invite them along? Job seekers benefit from the opportunity to make new contacts and connections, PLUS it’s good for them to get out of the house and stay involved!

Tip #7: Be positive
Job seekers need positive support and to keep focused on opportunities rather than bad economic conditions and negative news. This is one of the most powerful ways you can support them…with your positive attitude!

My clients are finding and landing jobs every day – the jobs ARE out there and so is help and support. Be sure to remind them of this.

So, do you have additional ways that you have been supporting and assisting your job seeking friends and associates? Please share your helpful ideas here!

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3 Job Search Strategies For Today’s Economy

Tuesday, October 14th, 2008

 

Okay, things in our economy aren’t going so well. Though I can’t look into the future to see what will happen, what I can do for you today is share three tips that will increase your odds of getting the job you want.

Job Search Strategy #1: Go where the jobs are It’s a wise move to read the executive job trend reports put out by my colleague, Mark Hovind, President of JobBait. I am a big fan of these monthly statistics that show you clearly what markets are growing and hiring and in what states. In an uncertain economy, go where jobs are being created.

Job Search Strategy #2: Turn off the television Seriously. Turn it off. It’s completely negative and “all consuming.” It’s my personal opinion that mainstream media is anything but “fair and balanced.” Don’t worry, you won’t lose touch. In fact, you will gain precious time in your day and you will be more at peace. You can focus on those things important in your immediate world. Every day, through my sources, I am literally flooded with HUNDREDS of great job openings just from recruiters trying to find great talent (like you!) for their client companies. You won’t hear THAT on the evening news!

Job Search Strategy #3: Commit to at least 2 non traditional job search methods Please allow me to just be blunt. Are you between 40 and 60 years old? Then you probably are most familiar and conmfortable with traditional job search methods. You simply must take a little time to invest in learning about how you can find jobs that aren’t advertised. I believe I have the best guidebook in the market for this but I would rather have you buy someone else’s than nothing at all. It’s important because the techniques people use to find jobs that are not advertised also decrease their competition by a MILE, improve their response rate TREMENDOUSLY (which does wonders for their confidence), and often results in more job interviews, bigger offers and a shorter job search. You have much to gain and nothing to lose by learning these techniques. I promise you.

Optimism in times like these is absolutely necessary to finding a job or making a career transition. Focus the same energy that drives your career success to find a new position and you will indubitably find the silver lining in the clouds of turbulent economic times.


 

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Job Hunting? Industry Bright Spots Worth Checking Out

Thursday, July 10th, 2008

 

 

 

No doubt it is a tough job market out there. However there are some bright lights in several established and emerging new industries that are worth checking out:

 

Manufacturing

Recently on the news you may have heard that manufacturing, which has been in steady decline in the USfor years, may experience a comeback. Rising prices due to increased transportation costs, coupled with the weakness of the dollar may stimulate onshoring. As a result, many large companies are opting to expand their facilities within the US.

 

Executive Level Jobs

Additionally, according to the US Dept. of Labor Statistics, nationwide in 2008, the industries expected to generate the highest number of future executive-level jobs are high-tech, healthcare, business services, pharmaceutical/medical/biotech, and     energy/utilities.

 

Geographic Areas

Also according to the US Dept. of Labor Statistics 2008, there are some States that are holding fairly steady growth for the majority of job sectors. They include Texas, Wyoming, Utah, Oklahoma, New Hampshire and Colorado.

 

Green Collar Jobs

If you Google green jobs, you can spend hours surfing through dozens of new job boards designed for those who are interested in jobs dealing with sustainable issues and the new clean-tech economy. Companies you will find range from wind farms to solar and hybrid car manufacturers to green buildings and other renewable energy technologies.

 

And according to TIME Magazines article titled: What Is a Green Collar Job anyway, John McCain, Barack Obama and Hillary Clinton all love green-collar jobs and claim their respective energy plans will create millions of new green-collar jobs in America.

 

A wise idea for the career industry changer in these market conditions is to evaluate those emerging and still-strong industries when strategically making a move.

 

 

 

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Three Ways You Can Protect Your Job in Times of Economic Uncertainty

Monday, July 7th, 2008

 

Are you looking for positive and tangible ways to increase your real and perceived value to your current company? If so, congratulations on your wise decision! Increasing your value can help avoid layoffs and job instability. It can also serve you in terms of excellent job reviews and potential salary increases.

 

Not only will your focus pay off in real time, but also in the future! If you love your job and want to protect it, here are 3 easy tips that you can take action on right now, for increasing your value:

 

Tip One: track your accomplishments

Do you ever catch yourself feeling like your boss should just be making mental notes of every accomplishment you make? Avoid making this potentially costly mistake simply by making a note of each of your accomplishments in real time, When your annual job review comes up you can present your employer with a list of challenges and what action you took. They will love it and appreciate your focus of attention.

 

You can then repurpose your list through updating your resume with lots of quantifiable accomplishments you may have missed by not writing them down! Don’t be tempted to overlook what you may see as small accomplishments that “are just part of your job.”  Often what you see as mundane others see as marked improvements and demonstrations of your skills.  Trust me on this one!

 

Tip Two: take on projects

Asking your employer for additional projects in areas you excel is an excellent way to demonstrate additional value into your position. Taking on a volunteer effort, being a part of a research or innovation committee or involvement in a special task force – lets say to “green up” next years operations, are valuable contributions and also serve to keep you motivated and challenged. It may even inspire a renewed enthusiasm for your company or position. You may be surprised on this one!

 

What if you are “too busy” to take on any additional work? Well, many professionals feel this way initially. However I would challenge you to look at how you are spending your time and see if you can find one thing you can give to someone else to manage in order to free up your time to do something where professionally, you stand to bring more value. Examples of this include administrative duties and repeat managerial or operational tasks that other support members of your team could take on as an additional personal challenge for them.

 

Tip Three: provide solutions

You know that glaring problem or issue in your company that keeps getting ignored either because it’s too large or too small for anyone to take care of right now? Proactively provide solutions to gain additional visibility by providing tangible value and demonstrating your positive initiative. Make sure when you present your idea; to present it to more than one person (3 or more is best) and just give enough information initially to garner some real interest. Don’t worry if initially you don’t have all the answers. That’s what teams are for! Progress towards active and positive change should be the goal – not perfection.

 

Using these simple steps will help you plan and achieve your goals faster and easier as well as increasing the value you bring to your company! 

 

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