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Tag: executive careers (page 1 of 4)

U.S. Job Openings at a 16-Year High

The monthly Job Openings and Labor Turnover Survey, or JOLTS, released by the Labor Department on Tuesday shows job openings at a record high.

Read more here!

New Survey Reveals Whether Online Portfolios (i.e. Online Resume / Portfolio & Bio Websites) Actually Work

Did you know that a recent Hovers survey shows that 86% of employers will visit a portfolio site if given the option? This is SO interesting!

Full survey results here

U.S. Industry Growth – Companies That Are Expanding and Hiring!

Lots of planned job growth across our great Nation on the horizon!  Growth companies across industries include Hospitality, Aviation, Technology, Manufacturing, and wine and spirits (just to name a few).

 

Details here:

http://leads.careercloud.com/

***When you click on the links showing who is hiring, you need to click again on the BLACK, “Go To” link, in order to read the article relating to the companies specific growth plans.

Companies Across the U.S. Growing, Expanding and Hiring

 

Companies across the US that are growing, expanding and hiring in multiple industries:

Read about it here!

Growth Industries USA

whats-driving-job-growth-in-2015Job creation WAY way up in November/Private sector, service industry jobs dominate: http://www.cnbc.com/2016/11/30/us-private-sector-jobs-nov-2016-adp.html

 

And another:

 

wind_and_solar_energy   Solar and Wind Energy Industry hopeful under new Trump administration: http://www.reuters.com/article/us-usa-trump-renewables-idUSKBN13N0X7

 

The Most (and Least) Empathetic Companies, 2016 from Harvard Business Review

Guess what top global companies have (and which ones lack) the most empathetic cultures and retain the best talent?

 

This list surprised me!

Check it out here!

 

 

How was the research compiled? I find the combination of analyzing tweets, Glassdoor and reported scandals quite fascinating:

…We break down empathy into categories: ethics, leadership, company culture, brand perception, and public messaging through social media. Our publicly available metrics including CEO approval ratings from staff, ratio of women on boards, and number of accounting infractions and scandals. This year we added a carbon metric. The financial information came from S&P Capital IQ, and the employee information from Glassdoor. We analyzed 2 million tweets from between September 27 and October 16 this year. An additional source of qualitative data expanded the survey: We used a panel selected from the World Economic Forum’s Young Global Leaders. The leaders were asked to rate the companies’ morality.

 

The Best Companies Invest Aggressively in These 3 Areas

Great article for so many of my clients.jun16-30-117087933-1024x576  The points that stuck with me most include:

  • We have never met great leaders who feel they have over-invested in talent.
  • Companies can and should continue to “think big” even as they grow.
  • They’re “spiky” in how they allocate funds and they invest big in three areas:  game-changing capabilities, next-generation leaders, and next generation business models.
  • They use the power of 10X—a willingness to commit 10 times the normal resources—on their critical capabilities.

Read more here.

 

Great advice from Harvard Business Review: Give Yourself Permission to Work Fewer Hours

I love this article from Harvard Business Review! I always coach my clients to lead and manage their job search by setting up systems and keeping an eye on the hours they spend on their transition. This way, they feel more in control and they protect themselves from “job search burnout.” I do this with my company too. High achievers benefit from this by being more present and having more energy as well as keeping an eye on anything that could be delegated to others. Simple stuff with a very palpable return.

Read more here

Tips on How CXOs Can Optimize Their Executive LinkedIn Profiles

Many C-level executives tell me they have a LinkedIn profile but don’t really do anything with it. Other CXOs share they don’t even have a profile. Concerns range from simple lack of time or interest to privacy concerns.

I think the main issue is lack of understanding relative to value. Many executives simply don’t see how LinkedIn can benefit them. But there IS value in having a LinkedIn profile if you are a top executive. Below are several ideas and tips for leveraging those benefits:

Adjust Your Privacy & Settings

First, if you are concerned about privacy, in the security settings of your profile, you can change the setting for “Select who can see your connections” to “Only you.”

This way, your company and your competition cannot see who you are connected to. And if you wish to connect with others that may raise an eyebrow or two within your team (top-retained recruiters—or even your competition), no one can view your connections except for you.

Summary Statement

It’s a good idea to have an email—and maybe even a phone number—at the very beginning of the Summary statement. This ensures that people who may be visiting your profile can reach out to you, even if they may be outside of your first- or second-degree network of connections. If you are open to new opportunities, there is no reason to broadcast it, since you can very easily give someone a way to reach out to you!

Privacy tip: set up a new Gmail account with a variation of your name or something that is business-friendly, and use that email in your LinkedIn Summary statement.

Keyword Headings

When deciding on your keyword headings, think about what a recruiter or other key decision maker might be looking for when searching for someone like you. An advanced degree, splashy award, high-level certification, or size/scope information, such as “Fortune 500 Companies,” “Fast Growth Start-Ups,” Board Member,” or “International Expansions.” If you are looking to change industries, think of how broad your industry choice can be without looking as if you are searching for another opportunity.

Depth & Breadth

Most resume writers agree that LinkedIn profiles are best written in first-person informal. Generally speaking, the details in your profile should not be covered as thoroughly as they are in your executive resume. A good rule of thumb is to add just enough detail to create intrigue. Your profile should never, in my professional opinion, broadcast that you are looking for another opportunity. LinkedIn seems to work best for establishing thought leadership and to expand your network into specific areas.

Expand Your Network

When you expand your network with recruiters and key decision makers across a few industries and divisions, you are creating a network that can be leveraged. For example, a few years ago my husband was complaining that his LinkedIn connections were almost nonexistent. He is in the wine business, so I suggested he find those in “his tribe” through direct searches and LinkedIn groups and invite them into his network. Within 45 days my husband had more than 400 of the most powerful global connections of suppliers, distributors, wineries, vintners, wine-recruiters, HR directors, and high-profile critics in the wine industry. He regularly receives important information and job solicitations now through his LinkedIn profile.

Thought Leadership

Have your read an insightful industry article in Forbes that you agree with? Did you recently attend—or even better—speak at an industry conference? Attend or help lead a community event? Why not share that in your activity broadcast? Articles are another great way to share your insight; including pictures or videos will make them more clickable. Remember to keep it all business! This is an excellent way to solidify your brand and thought leadership within your network.

Although there are many other optimization and design tips that are important to know, these tips are great starting points to get you using LinkedIn as a tool that will give you market leverage and solidify your branding message.

Resilience is About How You Recharge Not How You Endure

jun16-24-611469745-1024x576Fantastic article from Harvard Business Review.  I always tell my clients to increase double their play time & get their executive transition search activities down to 2 hours a week.  At first they think I am crazy but it works so well! This article explains why.  Read more here

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